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Brainbuster - How Much Do You Know About Mexico?

Kay Bona - Daily Record
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April 29, 2013

When visiting Jalisco, you might encounter a group of indigenous people who sell their handicrafts for a living. What are they called?

Cinco de Mayo is coming up soon, and there will be several celebrations surrounding that Mexican event. How much do you know about our neighbors in Mexico and the history of the country?

1. You’re strolling in any plaza (town square) on a Sunday afternoon. Along comes a group of musicians, playing and singing, dressed in fancy, tight-fitting suits and large sombreros. What are these musicians called? Maracas; Marimba; Manzanas; Mariachis.

2. Mexico has produced many fine artists. Probably the most famous was a painter and muralist born in Guanajuato. He was married to the painter Frida Kahlo. Can you name this artist? David Siquieros; Rufino Tamayo; Diego Rivera; Jose Orozco.

3. A spicy Mexican sausage, made with various kinds of meat and spices, is often served with eggs. You’ll see it hanging in long ropes in meat markets everywhere. Can you tell me the name of this spicy sausage? Churros; chorizo; chimichangas; chicharrones

4. There are two mountain ranges that run through Jalisco, one of which is the Neo-Volcanic Axis. What’s the other one? Sierra Madre Oriental; Sierra Madre del Norte; Sierra Madre del Sur; Sierra Madre Occidental.

5. Jalisco has many beautiful beach cities that attract many tourists, but it also has a few places where one can go to avoid the crowds. Which of the following is a small beach town located on the Costa Alegre off the Bay of Tenacatita? Lagos de Moreno; Acapulco; La Manzanilla; Arandas.

6. Which beautiful beach city located on Banderas Bay offers a wide variety of activities for its tourists, as well as being the filming location of the movie The Night of the Iguana? Acapulco; Puerto Vallarta; Cancun; Arandas.

7. When visiting Jalisco, you might encounter a group of indigenous people who sell their handicrafts for a living. What are they called? Huichols; Tainos; Mayas; Zapotecs.


1. Mariachis. The mariachi is symbolic of Mexican culture and tradition. No fiesta, wedding or even funeral is complete without mariachis. They accompany singers, or perform by themselves. A tradition in Mexico is for a young man to hire a mariachi group and serenade the young woman he loves at her bedroom window. Though most groups are composed of men, there are all-women mariachis, mixed-gender groups and children’s groups.
2. Diego Rivera. Diego Rivera was a cubist painter and muralist. He was quite well-known in the U.S. for a mural he painted in the lobby of the Rockefeller Building depicting communist figures contrasted with the U.S. founding fathers. That particular work was destroyed by an infuriated Rockefeller staff before it could be displayed.
3. Chorizo. Huevos con chorizo (eggs with chorizo) is a breakfast favorite, but chorizo can also be served alone, or mixed with beans or potatoes. Chorizo is usually made from pork and seasoned with chili. It has become quite popular in the U.S.
4. Sierra Madre Occidental. The Sierra Madre Occidental begins in Arizona and ends in Guanajuato, where it connects with the Sierra Madre Oriental.
5. La Manzanilla. Many natives of the area will travel to La Manzanilla to avoid the tourist-heavy beaches of towns like Puerto Vallarta. La Manzanilla is a small fishing village with several palapa restaurants and hotels.
6. Puerto Vallarta. Puerto Vallarta was founded in 1851 and was named after Ignacio Vallarta, who was once governor of Jalisco. Puerto Vallarta attracts many tourists every year and offers a wide variety of attractions. Some attractions of Puerto Vallarta include: golf courses, canopy tours, windsurfing, parasailing, horseback riding, art galleries, markets, and festivals. Puerto Vallarta has also been a filming location for several movies and shows, such as The Night of the Iguana, Predator, and Gauntlet 3.
7. Huichols. The Huichols are a group of indigenous people that live in the mountainous regions of Jalisco, Nayarit, Durango, and Zacatecas. They are somewhat isolated from society, and their villages are hard to reach. Many times, they will travel into cities and tourist spots to sell their handicrafts and artwork, including beaded jewelry, masks and other carvings, and yarn paintings.

  Learn more about The Huichol Center for Cultural Survival

  Learn more about Peyote People

  Check out Galeria Tanana

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CHARITY ALERT Vallarta Botanical Garden Needs Your Help

TripAdvisor singled out the Botanical Garden for removal and placed us on our own page in Cabo Corrientes.

Please write and ask TripAdvisor why all other Cabo Corrientes attractions are still on the Puerto Vallarta page while only the Garden was removed.

Click here to see all the details

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