Buying a Home: The Sad Truth About 'Investing' in Homeownership
James Dennin - Money.Mic
go to original
August 17, 2016

In the second quarter of this year, home ownership rates in the United States fell to their lowest level in more than 50 years. Around 63 percent of U.S. homes are owned. Nearly 40 countries on three continents – including China, Singapore, Mexico and Brazil – have higher home ownership rates. What’s to blame for the drop in the U.S. Millennials? (CCTV America)

Settling down and buying a home is often painted as an integral part of the American Dream: You stop paying rent and own your destiny — with a great investment, to boot.

That message certainly seems to resonate with many Americans, at least according to the results of a new survey from Bankrate, which found real estate to be the most popular "investment" that respondents named, ahead of the stock market, gold and cash savings.

The problem?

While homeownership means you're no longer contributing monthly payments to pad your landlord's pockets, your pockets won't necessarily be overflowing, either. As Robert Shiller — a Nobel Prize-winning economist who helped create a leading home price index — has cautioned, land and homes do not rise in value faster than inflation, at least over the long term. So not only does investing in real estate carry many costs and risks, but people have developed an exaggerated idea of how much their homes will appreciate in value.

Compared to, say, stocks, real estate is relatively illiquid, meaning that you can't easily buy it and sell it whenever you want; finding a buyer can take a long time. That can be dangerous for homeowners when housing prices take a sudden dive.

Properties also need to be maintained, whether the owner rents it out or lives in it themselves, which can be incredibly expensive: On average, these costs are between 1 and 4% of the home's annual value each year, an extra expense that young homeowners should not forget.

"If it's a home you purchase ... you have a mortgage plus any taxes, plus any insurance that you have to play yearly," said Alexa von Tobel, a certified financial planner and founder of LearnVest, a financial planning and services company. "When you step back and look at that, most people tend to overspend."

There's a big difference between thinking of your primary residence as a "real estate investment," and actually being a real estate investor who buys and sells investment properties, which can be quite lucrative if you have the necessary capital to get started — provided you know what you're doing.

Over the last 100 years, the price of land has risen by an average of about 1% per year. By contrast, the S&P 500, which tracks the stock prices of major U.S. companies, has grown about 10% per year.

Read the rest at Money.Mic

Related: Generation Z Believes Savings Are a Priority (Barrons)

Related: Credit Cards Are on the Rise Again, But Not Among Millennials, Which Could Lead to "Serious" Financial Setbacks (Money.Mic)

We invite you to add your charity or supporting organizations' news stories and coming events to PVAngels so we can share them with the world. Do it now!

You Can Make a Difference

Coronavirus - How You Can HelpIf you would like to donate directly to the non-profits in Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit, here are some suggestions you may want to consider to help our local communities in this time of greatest need.

Coronavirus - How You Can Help

Local News

Discover Vallarta-Nayarit

Banderas Bay offers 34 miles of incomparable coastline in the states of Jalisco and Nayarit, and is home to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit's many great destinations.